Animal care is provided mainly by the Mattive family.  We also have a handful of dedicated and hard working volunteers and knowledgable and compassionate veterinarians.

Most of our time is spent in food preparation, plus feeding and cleaning for the nearly 300 animals living at T&D's.  Food preparation includes gathering food from a few warehouses, farm feed stores, and grocery stores.  Farmers also bring deceased livestock for the carnivores (see below).  Once the food is gathered, then the hours of individual preparation begins whether it is opening boxes of produce and dividing it for the deer or primates or meat preparation for the carnivores.  Feeding usually takes place in the afternoon and evening depending on the species.  Feeding takes several hours daily. 

VETERINARIAN CARE & MEDICAL BUILDING
The animals at T&D's are very fortunate to have dedicated, compassionate, knowledgeable, and wonderful veterinarians who donate their services. Since the veterinarians donate their services, T&D's pays only for any medication and materials needed. By the kind donation of their services, our veterinarian bill averages a few thousand dollars per year instead of tens of thousands of dollars. Donations are welcome to help with our veterinarian expenses.

Prior to Fall 2003, the animals needed to be transported to the veterinarian clinic. In order to better help the animals, we were able to build a Medical Building with the help of Superior Walls and Bucknell University's Management 101 Spring 2003 class.
Superior Walls, Middleburg, PA, donated six pre-made concrete walls that were unable to be used for home construction. Our cost was for the crane and workers to place the walls.

Superior Walls setting the concrete walls in place.
Bucknell's Management 101 class divides into several "Companies" for the semester. They vote on officers and committees and choose an organization to help for the semester. Once an organization is chosen they then are responsible for a project within that organization. Their responsibilities are to find out what is needed for the project, organize work dates, choose and have a fundraiser for the project, purchase the materials, and then complete the project. In the Spring of 2003, "Company A" chose to help with the Medical Building roof.

Students attached the rafters, nailed wood supports in preparation for the metal, cut metal, and attached metal to roof. THANK YOU MANAGEMENT 101!

In the Fall of 2003, the Medical Building was completed! Most of the items seen in the photos were donated (from the cabinets to the stainless steel table) by our veterinarians and by Ron and Karen Thomas. THANK YOU! If needed, our veterinarians can do almost anything medically needed for the animals on in this building.
We are still in need of some medical equipment. Please contact us if you are able to help!

PROJECT COMPLETED!Thank you to everyone who helped make this project a success!




WHAT DO THE FELINES EAT?
Diet is also extremely important.  The carnivores eat over 12,000 pounds of meat each and every month!  This is equivalent to 10-12 cows!  Each lion and each tiger need 30-40 pounds (and sometimes up to 100 pounds) of meat every day.


WHERE DOES THE MEAT COME FROM?
The animals receive help from local farmers who donate cows, horses, and calves that have died from natural causes.  The PA Game Commission bring road-killed deer.  Some of the felines and other carnivores are given rodents.  Even with this help, food must be purchased for the animals.  Not only is feeding a carcass diet natural for the cats, it also provides enrichment by allowing the cats to show natural behaviors.

DO WE FEED LIVE ANIMALS?
No live animals are never fed to the carnivores. Though that is what they would live on in the wild, they are not in the wild and do not have the skills needed to hunt their own food.

HELP FEED THE FELINES
and other animals at T&D's!

Our expenses vary from year to year depending on how many animals call T&D's home and the amount of donated food. between $1,500.00-$2,000.00 a MONTH is spent for food.
You can
HELP by sending a donation, contacting us if you are a farmer, and spreading the word!

ANIMAL ENRICHMENT
WHAT IS ANIMAL ENRICHMENT?
Do you like the same routine? Do you get tired of your bedroom or living room furniture in the same place? Do you like to eat the same foods? Your answer is probably "no". Most people like some change in their lives. Animals need change in their lives, too. This change is often referred to as enrichment. Animals that are given enrichment opportunities may live longer and may have healthier lives.


HOW IS ENRICHMENT ACHIEVED?
All senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch) should be a part of enrichment. Animal enrichment may create mental stimulation and/or encourage natural behaviors. Some activities may involve exercise while others promote problem solving skills. Moving the "furniture" around in their enclosures or giving/taking items can also make a big difference. Enrichment may be as simple as giving an animal a ball, cardboard box, or toy. The activities or objects must also be safe for the animal.
Allie smelling a "scented" tree.









A funny face? Actually, felines have a "smelling" gland on the roof of their mouth, called the Jacobson's Organ. By making this face, the scent is pulled to the Jacobson's Organ. This organ allows felines to be able distinguish scents better.
Remember, if variety is the spice of life, then the same ball which is in a pen for months, may now no longer be interesting for that animal and boredom may set in. Removing that ball for a certain amount of time and then placing it back in the pen may be once again interesting for the animal. Or if the ball is scented and then put back in the pen, the animal may be intrigued once again.
     Fiona investigating the ball!     Fiona grabbing the ball!















Complex feeders are used for the raccoon, lemur, otter, and other animals which allows the animal to manipulate the feeder and work for its food. Hiding food in straw or under rocks or logs provides a way for animals to forage. Hanging toys or food allows those animals that jump or climb an opportunity to exercise muscles that otherwise go unused. Natural oils, herbs, and perfumes are used in and around the animal's enclosures to stimulate their sense of smell. Whole carcasses are the main source of food for the carnivores at T&D's. Not only is this the most natural and nutritional diet for these animals, but it also provides enrichment for them. Carcasses stimulate natural animal behaviors. Some animals will stalk its' "prey", jump on it, and then drag it away (some will even bury it to protect it from other predators).
Baggie looking at a bowling ball pin. Is it worth grabbing?
He must think so!





















WHEN IS ENRICHMENT PROVIDED?
T&D's provides enrichment activities everyday for the animals. When you visit the animals, look for enrichment items. Some items are bought, made, or donated. If you would like to help provide enrichment opportunities for the animals, please contact us.
 
WE CAN ALWAYS USE
PVC pipe         Dog, Cat, & Parrot Toys         Rope

For more information about enrichment, visit the American Association of Zookeepers website at www.aazk.org




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